About

Felicity grew up in the country outside Perth, Western Australia – the daughter of an Australian photojournalist father and an English equestrienne mother.

She was also educated in Yorkshire, UK and in Boston, USA. She obtained an Honours Degree in Fine Art from Curtin University of Technology, majoring in painting. At the same time she studied photography, classical ballet, Martha Graham technique and performed in concerts and children’s pantomime.
After graduation, Felicity taught for one year in an art school and then moved to Melbourne where she worked in film production for 17 years, married, and had two children. In 1983 her house burned down in the Ash Wednesday bush fires in Victoria, destroying everything including household pets and 6 years’ paintings ready for a major exhibition.

A few years later, Felicity realised a life long dream and started to write and illustrate children’s books, drawing on her experience in the film industry and her skills as a photographer and painter.
She has travelled and lived in USA, Canada, UK and Europe and has had several exhibitions of her work in Australia, UK and France. She has had numerous private commissions and participation in group exhibitions. Her most recent solo exhibition was in January 2011 at Qdos Gallery in Lorne, Victoria.

Her paintings are represented in private collections in Australia, UK, NZ, USA and France. She has worked as an art teacher and as a part time tutor mentor to photojournalism students,  been an Artist in Residence and guest lecturer.

Felicity’s stories in her children’s books are based on contemporary issues, while encased in fantasy. She often says she could not survive without her painting and her stories – they are always there for her when life becomes difficult. In the words of her fellow artist and friend, the late Mireille Ipeau – ‘painting is oxygen’.

Felicity has lived over a 6-year period in the Loire Valley, France. She now lives and works in Anglesea on the Victorian surf coast where she is also a beekeeper and beachcomber.